The History Place - Presidential Impeachment Proceedings

President Clinton's Answers to 81 Questions
November 27, 1998

(Below is the text of President Bill Clinton's answers, prepared by his private attorneys, to 81 questions submitted to him on November 5, 1998, by the House Judiciary Committee.)

Set forth below are the answers to the questions that you have asked me.

I would like to repeat, at the outset, something that I have said before about my approach to these proceedings. I have asked my attorneys to participate actively, but the fact that there is a legal defense to the various allegations cannot obscure the hard truth, as I have said repeatedly, that my conduct was wrong. It was also wrong to mislead people about what happened and I deeply regret that.

For me, this long ago ceased to be primarily a legal or political issue and became instead a painful personal one, demanding atonement and daily work toward reconciliation and restoration of trust with my family, my friends, my administration and the American people. I hope these answers will contribute to a speedy and fair resolution of this matter.

1. Do you admit or deny that you are the chief law enforcement officer of the United States of America?

CLINTON: The President is frequently referred to as the chief law enforcement officer, although nothing in the Constitution specifically designates the president as such. Article II Section 1 of the United States Constitution states that "the executive power shall be vested in a president of the United States of America," and the law enforcement function is a component of the executive power.

2. Do you admit or deny that upon making your oath of office that you swore you would faithfully execute that office of President of the United States and would to the best of your ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States?

A: At my inaugurations in 1993 and 1997 I took the following oath: "I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of The United States and will to the best of my ability preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States."

3. Do you admit or deny that pursuant to Article II, section 2 of the Constitution you have a duty to "take care that the laws be faithfully executed?"

A: Article II Section 3 ( not Section 2) of the Constitution states that the President "shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed" and that is a presidential obligation.

4. Do you admit or deny that you are a member of the bar and an officer of the court of a state of the United States, subject to the rules of professional responsibility and ethics applicable to the bar of that state?

A: I have an active license to practice law (inactive for continuing legal education purposes) issued by the Supreme Court of Arkansas. The license, No. 73017, was issued in 1973.

5. Do you admit or deny that you took an oath in which you swore to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth in a deposition conducted as part of a judicial proceeding in the case of Jones v. Clinton on January 17, 1998?

A: I took an oath to tell the truth on January 17, 1998, before my deposition in the Jones v. Clinton case. While I do not recall the precise wording of that oath, as I previously stated in my grand jury testimony on August 17, 1998, in taking the oath "I believed then that I had to answer the questions truthfully." App. at 458.

6. Do you admit or deny that you look an oath in which you swore or affirmed to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, before a grand jury empanelled as part of a judicial proceeding before the United States District Court for the District of Columbia Circuit on August 17, 1998?

A: As the August 17, 1998, videotape reflects, I was asked "Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about to give in this matter will be the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth, so help you God?," and I answered, "I do."

7. Do you admit or deny that on or about October 7, 1997, you received a letter composed by Monica Lewinsky in which she expressed dissatisfaction with her search for a job in New York?

A: As some point I learned of Ms. Lewinsky's decision to seek suitable employment in New York. I do not recall receiving a letter in which she expressed dissatisfaction about her New York job search. I understand Ms. Lewinsky has stated that she sent a note indicating her decision to seek employment in New York, but I do not believe she has said the note expressed dissatisfaction about her search for a job there. App. at 822-23 (grand jury testimony of Ms. Lewinsky).

8. Do you admit or deny that you telephoned Monica Lewinsky early in the morning on October 10, 1997, and offered to assist her finding a job in New York?

A. I understand that Ms. Lewinsky testified that I called her on the 9th of October, 1997, App. at 823 (grand jury testimony of Ms. Lewinsky). I do not recall that particular telephone call.

(Questions 9-12 are answered together)

9. Do you admit or deny that on or about October 11, 1997, you met with Monica Lewinsky in or about the Oval Office dining room?

10. Do you admit or deny that on or about October 11, 1997, Monica Lewinsky furnished to you, in or about the Oval Office dining room, a list of jobs in New York in which she was interested?

11. Do you admit or deny that on or about October 11, 1997, you suggested to Monica Lewinsky that Vernon Jordan may be able to assist her in her job search?

12. Do you admit or deny that on or about October 11, 1997, after meeting with Monica Lewinsky and discussing her search for a job in New York, you telephoned Vernon Jordan?

Response to Requests 9-12:

A: At some point, Ms. Lewinsky either discussed with me or gave me a list of the kinds of jobs she was interested in, although, I do not know whether it was on Saturday, Oct., 11, 1997. Records included in the OIC referral indicate that Ms. Lewinsky visited the White House on Oct. 11, 1997, App. at 2594, and I may have seen her on that day.

I do not believe I suggested to Ms. Lewinsky that Mr. Jordan might be able to assist her in her job search, and I understand that Ms. Lewinsky has stated that she asked me if Mr. Jordan could assist her in finding a job in New York. App. at 1079 (grand jury testimony of Ms. Lewinsky); App. at 1393 (7/27/98 FBI Form 302 interview of Ms. Lewinsky) App. at 1461-62 (7/31/98 FBI Form 302 interview of Ms. Lewinsky)

I speak to Mr. Jordan often and I understand that records included in the OIC referral that he telephoned me shortly after Ms. Lewinsky left the White House complex. Supp. at 1836, 1839. I understand that Mr. Jordan testified that he and I did not discuss Ms. Lewinsky during that call. Supp. at 1793-94 (grand jury testimony of Vernon Jordan).

(Questions 13-15 and question 19 are answered together)

13. Do you admit or deny that you discussed with Monica Lewinsky prior to December 17, 1997, a plan in which she would pretend to bring you papers with a work-related purpose when in fact such papers had no work-related purpose, in order to conceal your relationship?

14. Do you admit or deny that you discussed with Monica Lewinsky prior to December 17, 1997, that Betty Currie should be the one to clear Ms. Lewinsky in to see you, so Ms. Lewinsky could say that she was visiting with Ms. Currie instead of with you?

15. Do you admit or deny that you discussed with Monica Lewinsky prior to December 17, 1997, that if either of you were questioned about the existence of your relationship you would deny its existence?

19. Do you admit or deny that on or about December 17, 1997, you suggested to Monica Lewinsky that she could say to anyone inquiring about her relationship with you that her visits to the Oval Office were for the purpose of visiting with Betty Currie or to deliver papers for you?

Response to Request Nos. 13, 14, 15 and 19:

I was asked essentially these same questions by OIC lawyers. I testified that Ms. Lewinsky and I "may have talked about what to do in a non-legal context at some point in the past, but I have no specific memory of that conversation." App. at 569. That continues to be my recollection today that is, any such conversation was not in connection with her status as a witness in the Jones v. Clinton case.

16. Do you admit or deny that on or about December 6, 1997, you learned that Monica Lewinsky's name was on a witness list in the case of Jones v. Clinton?

A: As I stated in my August 17th grand jury testimony, I believe that I found out that Ms. Lewinsky's name was on a witness list in the Jones v. Clinton case late in the afternoon of the 6th of December, 1997. App. at 535.

(Questions 17 and 18 are answered together)

17. Do you admit or deny that on or about December 17, 1997, you told Monica Lewinsky that her name was on the witness list in the case of Jones v. Clinton?

18. Do you admit or deny that on or about December 17, 1997 you suggested to Monica Lewinsky that the submission of an affidavit in the case of Jones v. Clinton might suffice to prevent her from having to testify personally in that case?

Response to Requests Nos. 17 and 18:

A: As I previously testified, I recalled telephoning Ms. Lewinsky to tell her Ms. Currie's brother had died, and that call was in the middle of December. App. at 567. I do not recall other particulars of such a call, including whether we discussed the fact that her name was on the Jones v. Clinton witness list. As I stated in my August 17th grand jury testimony in response to essentially the same questions, it is "quite possible that it happened ... I don't have any memory of it, but I certainly wouldn't dispute that I might have said that (she was on the witness list)." App. at 567.

I recall that Ms. Lewinsky asked me at some time in December whether she might be able to get out of testifying in the Jones v. Clinton case because she knew nothing about Ms. Jones or the case. I told her I believed other witnesses had executed affidavits and there was a chance they would not have to testify. As I stated in my August 17th grand jury testimony, "I felt strongly that (Ms. Lewinsky) could execute an affidavit that would be factually truthful, that might get her out of having to testify." App. at 571. I never asked or encouraged Ms. Lewinsky to lie in her affidavit, as Ms. Lewinsky herself has confirmed. See App. at 718 (2/1/98 handwritten proffer of Ms. Lewinsky); see also App. at 1161 (grand jury testimony of Ms. Lewinsky).

19. For the response to request No. 19 see response to request No. 13, et. al. supra.

20. Do you admit or deny that you gave false and misleading testimony under oath when you stated during your deposition in the case of Jones v. Clinton on January 17, 1998, that you did not know if Monica Lewinsky had been subpoenaed to testify in that case?

A: It is evident from my testimony on pages 69 to 70 of the deposition that I did know on January 17, 1998, that Ms. Lewinsky had been subpoenaed in the Jones v. Clinton case. Ms. Jones' lawyer's question, "Did you talk to Mr. Lindsey about what action, if any, should be taken as a result of her being served with a subpoena?", and my response, "No," id. at 70, reflected my understanding that Ms. Lewinsky had been subpoenaed. That testimony was not false and misleading.

21. Do you admit or deny that you gave false and misleading testimony under oath when you stated before the grand jury on August 17, 1998, that you did know, prior to January 17, l998, that Monica Lewinsky had been subpoenaed to testify in the case of Jones v. Clinton?

A: As my testimony on January 17 reflected, and as I testified on August 17, 1998, I knew prior to January 17, 1998, that Ms. Lewinsky had been subpoenaed to testify in Jones v. Clinton. App. at 487. That testimony was not false and misleading.

22. Do you admit or deny that on or about December 28, 1997, you had a discussion with Monica Lewinsky at the White House regarding her moving to New York?

A: When I met with Ms. Lewinsky on December 28, 1997, I knew she was planning to move to New York and we discussed her move.

23. Do you admit or deny that on or about December 28, 1997, you had a discussion with Monica Lewinsky at the White House in which you suggested to her that she move to New York soon because by moving to New York, the lawyers representing Paula Jones in the case of Jones v. Clinton may not contact her?

A: Ms. Lewinsky had decided to move to New York well before the end of December 1997. By December 28, Ms. Lewinsky had been subpoenaed. I did not suggest that she could avoid testifying in the Jones v. Clinton case by moving to New York.

(Questions 24 and 25 are answered together.)

24. Do you admit or deny that on or about December 28, 1997, you had a discussion with Monica Lewinsky at the White House regarding gifts you had given to Ms. Lewinsky that were subpoenaed in the case of Jones v. Clinton?

25. Do you admit or deny that on or about December 28, 1997, you expressed concern to Monica Lewinsky about a hatpin you had given to her as a gift which had been subpoenaed in the case of Jones v. Clinton?

Response to Request Nos. 24 and 25:

A: As I told the grand jury, "Ms. Lewinsky said something to me like, what if they ask me about the gifts you've given me," App. at 495, but I do not know whether that conversation occurred on December 28, 1997, or earlier. Ibid. Whenever this conversation occurred, I testified, I told her "that if they asked her for gifts, she'd have to give them whatever she had. ..." App. at 495. I simply was not concerned about the fact that I had given her gifts. See App. at 495-98. Indeed, I gave her additional gifts on December 28, 1997. I also told the grand jury that I do not recall Ms. Lewinsky telling me that the subpoena specifically called for a hatpin that I had given her. App. at 496.

(Questions 26 and 27 are answered together)

26. Do you admit or deny that on or about December 28, 1997, you discussed with Betty Currie gifts previously given by you to Monica Lewinsky?

27. Do you admit or deny that on or about December 28, (1997), you requested, instructed, suggested to or otherwise discussed with Betty Currie that she take possession of gifts previously given to Monica Lewinsky by you?

Response to Request Nos. 26 and 27:

A: I do not recall any conversation with Ms. Currie on or about December 28, 1997, about gifts I had previously given to Ms. Lewinsky. I never told Ms. Currie to take possession of gifts I had given Ms. Lewinsky. I understand Ms. Currie has stated that Ms. Lewinsky called Ms. Currie to ask her to hold a box. See Supp. at 531.

28. Do you admit or deny that you had a telephone conversation on January 6, 1998, with Vernon Jordan during which you discussed Monica Lewinsky's affidavit, yet to be filed, in the case of Jones v. Clinton?

A: White House records included in the OIC Referral reflect that I spoke to Mr. Jordan on January 6, 1998. Supp. at 1886. I do not recall whether we discussed Ms. Lewinsky's affidavit during a telephone call on that date.

(Questions 29 and 30 are answered together.)

29. Do you admit or deny that you had knowledge of the fact that Monica Lewinsky executed for filing an affidavit in the case of Jones v. Clinton on January 7, 1998?

30. Do you admit or deny that on or about January 7, 1998, you had a discussion with Vernon Jordan in which he mentioned that Monica Lewinsky executed for filing an affidavit in the case of Jones v. Clinton?

Response to request Nos. 29 and 30:

A. As I testified to the grand jury, "I believe that (Mr. Jordan) did notify us when she signed her affidavit. App. at 525. While I do not recall the timing, as I told the grand jury, I have no reason to doubt Mr. Jordan's statement that he notified me about the affidavit around January 7, 1998. Ibid.

31. Do you admit or deny that on or about January 7, 1998, you had a discussion with Vernon Jordan in which he mentioned that he was assisting Monica Lewinsky in finding a job in New York?

A: I told the grand jury that I was aware that Mr. Jordan was assisting Ms. Lewinsky in her job search in connection with her move to New York. App. at 526. I have no recollection as to whether Mr. Jordan discussed it with me on or about January 7, 1998.

(Questions 32 and 33 are answered together.)

32. Do you admit or deny that you viewed a copy of the affidavit executed by Monica Lewinsky on January 7, 1998, in the case of Jones v. Clinton, prior to your deposition in that case?

33. Do you admit or deny that you had knowledge that your counsel viewed a copy of the affidavit executed by Monica Lewinsky on January 7, 1998, in the case of Jones v. Clinton, prior to your deposition in that case?

Response to Request Nos. 32 and 33:

A: I do not believe I saw this affidavit before my deposition, although I cannot be absolutely sure. The record indicates that my counsel had seen the affidavit at some time prior to the deposition. See Dep. at 54.

(Questions 34 and 40 are answered together.)

34. Do you admit or deny that you had knowledge that any facts or assertions contained in the affidavit executed by Monica Lewinsky on January 7, 1998, in the case of Jones v. Clinton were not true?

40. Do you admit or deny that during your deposition in the case of Jones v. Clinton on January 17, 1998, you affirmed that the facts or assertions stated in the affidavit executed by Monica Lewinsky on January 7, 1998, were true?

Response to request Nos. 34 and 40:

A: I was asked at my deposition in January about two paragraphs of Ms. Lewinsky's affidavit. With respect to Paragraph 6, I explained the extent to which I was able to attest to its accuracy. Dep. at 202-03.

With respect to Paragraph 8, I stated in my deposition that it was true. Dep. at 204. In my August 17th grand jury testimony, I sought to explain the basis for that deposition answer: "I believe at the time that she filled out this affidavit, if she believed that the definition of sexual relationship was two people having intercourse, then this is accurate." App. at 473.

(Questions 35 and 36 are answered together.)

35. Do you admit or deny that you viewed a copy of the affidavit executed by Monica Lewinsky on January 7, 1998, in the case of Jones v. Clinton at your deposition in that case on January 17, 1998?

36. Do you admit or deny that you had knowledge that your counsel viewed a copy of the affidavit executed by Monica Lewinsky on January 7, 1998, in the case of Jones v. Clinton at your deposition in that case on January 17, 1998?

Response to Request Nos. 35 and 36:

A: I know that Mr. Bennett saw Ms. Lewinsky's affidavit during the deposition because he read portions of it loud at the deposition. See Dep. at 202. I do not recall whether I saw a copy of Ms. Lewinsky's affidavit during the deposition.

37. Do you admit or deny that on or about January 9, 1998, you received a message from Vernon Jordan indicating that Monica Lewinsky had received a job offer in New York?

A: At some time, I learned that Ms. Lewinsky had received a job offer in New York. However, I do not recall whether I first learned it in a message from Mr. Jordan or whether I learned it on that date.

(Questions 38 and 39 are answered together.)

38. Do you admit or deny that between January 9, 1998, and January 15, 1998, you had a conversation with Erskine Bowles in the Oval Office in which you stated that Monica Lewinsky received a job offer and had listed John Hilley as a reference?

39. Do you admit or deny that you asked Erskine Bowles if he would ask John Hilley to give Ms. Lewinsky a positive job recommendation?

Response to Request Nos. 38 and 39:

A: As I testified to the grand jury, I recall at some point talking to Mr. Bowles "about whether Monica Lewinsky could get a recommendation that was not negative from the Legislative Affairs office," or that "was at least neutral," although I am not certain of the date of the conversation. App. at 562-64. To suggest that I told Mr. Bowles that Ms. Lewinsky had received a job offer and had listed John Hilley as a reference is, as I testified, a "little bit" inconsistent with my memory. App. at 564. It is possible, as I also indicated, that she had identified Mr. Hilley as her supervisor on her resume and in that respect had already listed him as a reference. Ibid.

40. For the response to Request No. 40, see Response to Request No. 34, et al., supra.

41. As to each, do you admit or deny that you gave the following gifts to Monica Lewinsky at any time in the past?

a. A lithograph

b. A hatpin

c. A large "Black Dog" canvas bag

d. A large "Rockettes" blanket

e. A pin of the New York skyline

f. A box of cherry chocolates

g. A pair of novelty sunglasses

h. A stuffed animal from the "Black Dog"

i. A marble bear's head

j. A London pin

k. A shamrock pin

l. An Annie Lennox compact disc

m. Davidoff cigars

A: In my deposition in the Jones case, I testified that I "certainly ... could have" given Ms. Lewinsky a hat pin and that I gave her "something" from the Black Dog. Dep. at 75-76. In my grand jury testimony, I indicated that in late December 1997, I gave Ms. Lewinsky a Canadian marble bear's head carving, a Rockettes blanket, some kind of pin, and a bag (perhaps from the Black Dog) to hold these objects. App. at 484-487. I also stated that I might have given her such gifts as a box of candy and sunglasses, although I did not recall doing so, and I specifically testified that I had given Ms. Lewinsky gifts on other occasions. App. at 487. I do not remember giving her the other gifts listed in Question 41, although I might have. As I have previously testified, I receive a very large number of gifts from many different people, sometimes several at a time. I also give a very large number of gifts. I gave Ms. Lewinsky gifts, some of which I remember and some of which I do not.

42. Do you admit or deny that when asked on January 17, 1998, in your deposition in the case of Jones v. Clinton if you had ever given gifts to Monica Lewinsky you stated that you did not recall, even though you actually had knowledge of giving her gifts in addition to gifts from the "Black Dog"?

A: In my grand jury testimony, I was asked about this same statement. I explained that my full response was "I don't recall. Do you know what they were?" By that answer I did not mean to suggest that I did not recall giving gifts; rather, I meant that I did not recall what the gifts were and I asked for reminders. See App. at 502-03.

43. Do you admit or deny that you gave false and misleading testimony under oath in your deposition in the case of Jones v. Clinton when you responded "once or twice" to the question "has Monica Lewinsky ever given you any gifts?"

A: My testimony was not false and misleading. As I have testified previously, I give and receive numerous gifts. Before my January 17, 1998, deposition, I had not focused on the precise number of gifts Ms. Lewinsky had given me. App. at 495-98. My deposition testimony made clear that Ms. Lewinsky had given me gifts; at the deposition, I recalled "a book or two" and a tie. Dep. at 77. At the time, those were the gifts I recalled. In my response to OIC inquiries, after I had had a chance to search my memory and refresh my recollection, I was able to be more responsive. However, as my counsel have informed the OIC, in light of the very large number of gifts I received there might still be gifts from Ms. Lewinsky that I have not identified.

44. Do you admit or deny that on January 17, 1998, at or about 5:38 p.m., after the conclusion of your deposition in the case of Jones v. Clinton, you telephoned Vernon Jordan at his home?

A: I speak to Mr. Jordan frequently, so I cannot remember specific times and dates. According to White House records included in the OIC referral, I telephoned Mr. Jordan's residence on January 17, 1998, at or about 5:38 p.m. App. 2876.

(Questions 45, 46 and 47 are answered together.)

45. Do you admit or deny that on January 17, 1998, at or about 7:02 p.m., after the conclusion of your deposition in the case of Jones v. Clinton, you telephoned Betty Currie at her home?

46. Do you admit or deny that on January 17, 1998, at or about 7:02 p.m., after the conclusion of your deposition in the case of Jones v. Clinton, you telephoned Vernon Jordan at his office?

47. Do you admit or deny that on January 17, 1998, at or about 7:13 p.m., after the conclusion of your deposition in the case of Jones v. Clinton, you telephoned Betty Currie at her home and asked her to meet with you the next day, Sunday, January 18, 1998?

Response to Request Nos. 45, 46 and 47:

A: According to White House records included in the OIC Referral, I placed a telephone call to Ms. Currie at her residence at 7:02 p.m. and spoke to her at or about 7:13 p.m. App. at 2877. I recall that when I spoke to her that evening, I asked if she could meet with me the following day. According to White house records included in the OIC Referral, I telephoned Mr. Jordan's office on January 17, 1998, at or about 7:02 p.m. Ibid.

48. Do you admit or deny that on January 18, 1998, at or about 6:11 a.m., you learned of the existence of tapes of conversations between Monica Lewinsky and Linda Tripp recorded by Linda Tripp?

A: I did not know on January 18, 1998 that tapes existed of conversations between Ms. Lewinsky and Ms. Tripp recorded by Ms. Tripp. At some point on Sunday, January 18, 1998, I knew about the Drudge Report. I understand that while the report talked about tapes of phone conversations, it did not identify Ms. Lewinsky by name and did not mention Ms. Tripp at all. The report did not state who the parties to the conversations were or who taped the conversations.

49. Do you admit or deny that on January 18, 1998, at or about 12:50 p.m., you telephoned Vernon Jordan at his home?

A: According to White House records included in the OIC Referral, I telephoned Mr. Jordan's residence on January 18, 1998, at or about 12:50 p.m. App. at 2878.

50. Do you admit or deny that on January 18, 1998, at or about 1:11 p.m., you telephoned Betty Currie at her home?

A: According to White House records included in the OIC Referral, I telephoned Ms. Currie's residence on January 18, 1998, at or about 1:11 p.m. App. at 2878.

51. Do you admit or deny that on January 18, 1998, at or about 2:55 p.m., you received a telephone call from Vernon Jordan?

A: According to White House records included in the OIC Referral, Mr. Jordan telephoned me from his residence on January 18, 1998, at or about 2:55 p.m. App. at 2879.

52. Do you admit or deny that on January 18, 1998, at or about 5:00 p.m., you had a meeting with Betty Currie at which you made statements similar to any of the following regarding your relationship with Monica Lewinsky?

a. "You were always there when she was there, right? We were never really alone."

b. "You could see and hear everything."

c. "Monica came on to me, and I never touched her, right?"

d. "She wanted to have sex with me and I couldn't do that."

A: When I met with Ms. Currie, I believe that asked her certain question in an effort to get as much information as quickly as I could and make certain statements although I do not remember exactly what I said. See App. at 508.

Some time later, I learned that the Office of Independent Counsel was involved and that Ms. Currie was going to have to testify before the grand jury. After learning this, I stated in my grand jury testimony, I told Ms. Currie, "Just relax, go in there and tell the truth." App. at 591.

53. Do you admit or deny that you had a conversation with Betty Currie within several days of January 18, 1998, in which you made statements similar to any of the following regarding your relationship with Monica Lewinsky?

a. "You were always there when she was there, right? We were never really alone."

b. "You could see and hear everything."

c. "Monica came on to me, and I never touched her, right?"

d. "She wanted to have sex with me and I couldn't do that."

A: I previously told the grand jury that, "I don't know that I" had another conversation with Ms. Currie within several days of January 18, 1998, in which I made statements similar to those quoted above. "I remember having this (conversation) one time." App. at 592. I further explained, "I do not remember how many times I talked to Betty Currie or when. I don't. I can't possibly remember that. I do remember, when I first heard about this story breaking, trying to ascertain what the facts were, trying to ascertain what Betty's perception was. I remember that I was highly agitated, understandably, I think." App. at 593.

I understand that Ms. Currie has said a second conversation occurred the next day that I was in the White House (when she was), Supp. at 535-36, which would have been Tuesday, January 20, before I knew about the grand jury investigation.

54. Do you admit or deny that on January 18, 1998, at or about 11:02 p.m., you telephoned Betty Currie at her home?

A: According to White House records included in the OIC Referral, I called Ms. Currie's residence on January 18, 1998 at or about 11:02 p.m. App. at 2881.

55. Do you admit or deny that on Monday, January 19, 1998, at or about 8:50 a.m., you telephoned Betty Currie at her home?

A: According to White House records included in the OIC Referral, I called Ms. Currie's residence on January 19, 1998, at or about 8:50 a.m. App. at 3147.

56. Do you admit or deny that on Monday, January 19, 1998, at or about 8:56 a.m., you telephoned Vernon Jordan at his home?

A: According to White House records included in the OIC Referral, I called Mr. Jordan's residence on January 19, 1998, at or about 8:56 a.m. App. at 2864.

57. Do you admit or deny that on Monday January 19, 1998, at or about 10:58 a.m., you telephoned Vernon Jordan at his office?

A: According to White House records included in the OIC Referral, I called Mr. Jordan's office on January 19, 1998, at or about 10:58 a.m. App. at 2883.

58. Do you admit or deny that on Monday, January 19, 1998, at or about 1:45 p.m., you telephoned Betty Currie at her home?

A: According to White House records included in the OIC Referral, I called Ms. Currie's residence on January 19, 1998 at or about 1:45 p.m. App. at 2883.

(Questions 59 and 60 are answered together.)

59. Do you admit or deny that on Monday, January 19, 1998, at or about 2:44 p.m., you met with individuals including Vernon Jordan, Erskine Bowles, Bruce Lindsey, Cheryl Mills, Charles Ruff, and Rahm Emanuel?

60. Do you admit or deny that on Monday, January 19, 1998, at or about 2:44 p.m., at any meeting with Vernon Jordan, Erskine Bowles, Bruce Lindsey, Cheryl Mills, Charles Ruff, Rahm Emanuel and others you discussed the existence of tapes of conversations between Monica Lewinsky and Linda Tripp recorded by Linda Tripp, or any other matter relating to Monica Lewinsky?

Response to Request Nos. 59 and 60:

A: I do not believe such a meeting occurred. White House records included in the OIC Referral indicate that Mr. Jordan entered the White House complex that day at 2:44 p.m. Supp. at 1995. According to Mr. Jordan's testimony, he and I met alone in the Oval Office for about 15 minutes. Supp. at 1763 (grand jury testimony of Vernon Jordan).

I understand that Mr. Jordan testified that we discussed Ms. Lewinsky at that meeting and also the Drudge Report, in addition to other matters. Supp. at 1763. Please also see my response to request No. 48, supra.

61. Do you admit or deny that on Monday, January 19, 1998, at or about 5:56 p.m., you telephoned Vernon Jordan at his office?

A: According to White House records included in the OIC Referral, I called Mr. Jordan's office on January 19, 1998, at or about 5:56 p.m. App. at 2883.

(Questions 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67 and 68 are answered together.)

62. Do you admit or deny that on January 21, 1998, the day the Monica Lewinsky story appeared for the first time in The Washington Post, you had a conversation with Sidney Blumenthal in which you stated that you rebuffed alleged advances from Monica Lewinsky and in which you made a statement similar to the following? "Monica Lewinsky came at me and made a sexual demand on me."

63. Do you admit or deny that on January 21, 1998, the day the Monica Lewinsky story appeared for the first time in The Washington Post, you had a conversation with Sidney Blumenthal in which you made a statement similar to the following in response to a question about your conduct with Monica Lewinsky?: "I haven't done anything wrong."

64. Do you admit or deny that on January 21, 1998, the day the Monica Lewinsky story appeared for the first time in The Washington Post, you had a conversation with Erskine Bowles, Sylvia Matthews and John Podesta in which you made statements similar to the following? "I want you to know I did not have a sexual relationship with this woman Monica Lewinsky. I did not ask anybody to lie. And when the facts come out, you'll understand."

65. Do you admit or deny that on or about January 23, 1998, you had a conversation with John Podesta in which you stated that you had never had an affair with Monica Lewinsky?

66. Do you admit or deny that on or about January 23, 1998, you had a conversation with John Podesta in which you stated that you were not alone with Monica Lewinsky in the Oval Office, and that Betty Currie was either in your presence or outside your office with the door open while you were visiting with Monica Lewinsky?

67. Do you admit or deny that on or about January 26, 1998, you had a conversation with Harold Ickes in which you made statements to the effect that you did not have an affair with Monica Lewinsky?

68. Do you admit or deny that on or about January 26, 1998, you had a conversation with Harold Ickes in which you made statements to the effect that you had not asked anyone to change their story, suborn perjury or obstruct justice if called to testify or otherwise respond to a request for information from the Office of Independent Counsel or in any other legal proceeding?

Responses to Requests Nos. 62-68:

A: As I have previously acknowledged, I did not want my family, friends, or colleagues to know the full nature of my relationship with Ms. Lewinsky. In the days following the January 21, 1998, Washington Post article, I misled people about this relationship. I have repeatedly apologized for doing so.

(Questions 69, 70 and 71 are answered together.)

69. Do you admit or deny that on or about January 21, 1998, you and Richard "Dick" Morris discussed the possibility of commissioning a poll to determine public opinion following the Washington Post story regarding the Monica Lewinsky matter?

70. Do you admit or deny that you had a later conversation with Richard "Dick" Morris in which he stated that the polling results regarding the Monica Lewinsky matter suggested that the American people would forgive you for adultery but not for perjury or obstruction of justice?

71. Do you admit or deny that you responded to Richard "Dick" Morris's explanation of these polling results by making a statement similar to the following: "(w)ell, we just have to win then"?

Response to Request Nos. 69, 70 and 71:

A: At some point after the OIC investigation became public, Dick Morris volunteered to conduct a poll on the charges reported in the press. He later called back. What I recall is that he said the public was most concerned about obstruction of justice or subornation of perjury. I do not recall saying, "Well, we just have to win then."

72. Do you admit or deny the past or present existence of, or the past or present direct or indirect employment of individuals, other than counsel representing you, whose duties include making contact with or gathering information about witnesses or potential witnesses in any judicial proceeding related to any matter in which you are or could be involved?

A: I cannot respond to this inquiry because of the vagueness of its terms (e.g., "indirect," "potential," "could be involved"). To the extent it may be interpreted to apply to individuals assisting counsel, please see my responses to Request Nos. 73-76, infra. To the extent the inquiry addresses specific individuals, as in Request Nos. 73-75 infra., I have responded and stand ready to respond to any other specific inquiries.

73. Do you admit or deny having knowledge that Terry Lenzner was contacted or employed to make contact with or gather information about witnesses or potential witnesses in any judicial proceeding related to any matter in which you are or could be involved?

A: My counsel stated publicly on February 24, 1998, that Mr. terry Lenzner and his firm have been retained since April 1994 by two private law firms that represent me. It is commonplace for legal counsel to retain such firms to perform legal and appropriate tasks to assist in the defense of clients. See also Response to No. 72.

74. Do you admit or deny having knowledge that Jack Palladino was contacted or employed to make contact with or gather information about witnesses or potential witnesses in any judicial proceeding related to any matter in which you are or could be involved?

A: My understanding is that during the 1992 Presidential Campaign, Mr. Jack Palladino was retained to assist legal counsel for me and the Campaign on a variety of matters arising during the Campaign. See also response to No. 72.

75. Do you admit or deny having knowledge that Betsy Wright was contacted or employed to make contact with or gather information about witnesses or potential witnesses in any judicial proceeding related to any matter in which you are or could be involved?

A: Ms. Betsey Wright was my long-time chief of staff when I was Governor of Arkansas, and she remains a good friend and trusted advisor. Because of her great knowledge of Arkansas, from time to time my legal counsel and I have consulted with her on a wide range of matters. See also response to No. 72.

76. Do you admit or deny that you made false and misleading public statements in response to questions asked on or about January 21, 1998, in an interview with Roll Call, when you stated "Well, let me say, the relationship was not improper, and I think that's important enough to say. But because the investigation is going on, I don't know what is out what's going to be asked of me. I think I need to cooperate, answer the questions, but I think that it's important for me to make it clear what is not. And then, at the appropriate time, I'll answer to what is. But let me answer it is not an improper relationship and I know what the word means."

A: The tape of this interview reflects that in fact I said, "Well, let me say the relationship's not improper and I think that's important enough to say ..." With that revision, the quoted words accurately reflect my remarks. As I stated in Response to Request Nos. 62 to 68, in the days following the January 21, 1998, disclosures, I misled people about this relationship, for which I have apologized.

77. Do you admit or deny that you made false and misleading public statements in response to questions asked on or about January 21, 1998, in the Oval Office during a photo opportunity when you stated "Now there are lots of questions that I think are very legitimate. You have a right to ask them; you and the American people have a right to get answers. We are working very hard to comply and get all the requests for information up here and we will give you as many answers as we can as soon as we can at the appropriate time, consistent with our obligation to also cooperate with the investigations. And that's not a dodge, that's really (what) I've I've talked with (our) people. I want to do that. I'd like to have more rather than less, sooner rather than later. So we'll work through it as quickly as we can and get all those questions out there to you"?

A: I made this statement (as corrected), according to a transcript of a January 22, 1998 photo opportunity in the Oval Office. This statement was not false and misleading. It accurately represented my thinking.

78. Do you admit or deny that you discussed with Harry Thomasson, prior to making separate statements in response to questions asked by the press in January 1998, relating to your relationship with Monica Lewinsky, what such statements should be or how they should be communicated?

A: Mr. Thomason was a guest at the White House in January 1998, and I recall his encouraging me to state my denial forcefully.

79. Do you admit or deny that you made a false or misleading public statement in response to a question asked on or about January 26, 1998, when you stated "But I want to say one thing to the American people I want you to listen to me. I am going to say this again. I did not have sexual relations with that woman, Ms. Lewinsky?"

A: I made this statement on January 26, 1998 although not in response to any question. In referring to "sexual relations," I was referring to sexual intercourse. See also App. at 475. As I stated in response to request Nos. 62 to 68, in the days following the January 21, 1998, disclosures, answers like this misled people about this relationship, for which I have apologized.

80. Do you admit or deny that you made false and misleading public statements in response to a question asked on or about January 26, 1998, when you stated "... I never told anybody to lie, not a single time. Never"?

A: This statement was truthful: I did not tell Ms. Lewinsky to lie, and I did not tell anybody to lie about my relationship with Ms. Lewinsky. I understand that Ms. Lewinsky also has stated that I never asked or encouraged her to lie. See App. 718 (2/1/98 handwritten proffer of Ms. Lewinsky); see also App. at 1161 (grand jury testimony of Ms. Lewinsky).

81. Do you admit or deny that you directed or instructed Bruce Lindsey, Sidney Blumenthal, Nancy Hernreich and Lanny Breuer to invoke executive privilege before a grand jury empanelled as part of a judicial proceeding by the United States District Court for the District of Columbia Circuit in 1998?

A: On the recommendation of Charles Ruff, Counsel to the President, I authorized Mr. Ruff to assert the presidential communications privilege (which is one aspect of executive privilege) with respect to questions that might be asked of witnesses called to testify before the grand jury to the extent that those questions sought disclosure of matters protected by that privilege. Thereafter, I understand that the presidential communications privilege was asserted as to certain questions asked of Sidney Blumenthal and Nancy Hernreich. Further, I understand that, as to Mr. Blumenthal and Ms. Hernreich, all claims of executive privilege were subsequently withdrawn and they testified on several occasions before the grand jury.

Mr. Lindsey and Mr. Breuer testified at length before the grand jury about a wide range of matters, but declined, on the advice of White House Counsel, to answer certain questions that sought disclosure of discussions that they had with me and my senior advisors concerning, among other things, their legal advice as to the assertion of executive privilege. White House Counsel advised Mr. Lindsey and Mr. Breuer that these communications were protected by the attorney-client privilege as well as executive privilege. Mr. Lindsey also asserted my personal attorney-client privilege as to certain questions relating to his role as an intermediary between me and my personal counsel in the Jones v. Clinton case, a privilege that was upheld by the federal appeals court in the District of Columbia.

William Jefferson Clinton

Subscribed and sworn to before me this --- day of November, 1998.

Notary Public.

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